new work by Sam Moyer 

"Scheduled to coincide with the year’s longest days as the sea-sons transition from spring to summer, “Slowly” meditates on the appearance and disappearance of light."

 




Sam MOYER
"Slowly" May 28- July 17th

Galerie Rodolphe Janssen is proud to announce the debut of a new series of sculptures and paintings by artist Sam Moyer that address the dimensional, architectural, and environmental characteristics of the gal-lery as site. Installed in the center of the room are three large sculptures set in a row on axis with the gal-lery’s signature double-pitched skylights. Scheduled to coincide with the year’s longest days as the sea-sons transition from spring to summer, “Slowly” meditates on the appearance and disappearance of light. 

If there is one unifying interest across a diverse body of work with an expanding vocabulary of material form, it is Moyer’s investment in the effects of light and its impact on the integration and disintegration of space. In previous bodies of work light as an artificial phenomena was explored, notably through the inter-action of a concealed lighting grid hung above the suspended canvases of Moyer’s standout titular sculp-ture More Weight. Following these presentations, her work is now oft-cited in comparison to that of Richard Serra. However, Moyer’s commitment to the illusion of depth and the spatial experiences of light in space align her work more notably to the perceptual works of Robert Irwin or to the pictorial austerity found in paintings by Agnes Martin.

 Galerie Rodolphe Janssen 
Rue de Livourne 35 Livornostraat
1050 Brussels, Belgium 




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A selection of images taken in 
Antwerp and Brussels 






A front door in Antwerp





The entrance to our bed and breakfast in Antwerp, Boulevard Leopold.




 The front door of the Horta Museum, Brussels. 
 The private house and studio of Victor Horta.






 Poster for the upcoming exhibition at the BOZAR in Brussels.

"The Belgians. An Unexpected Fashion Story BOZAR and MAD Brussels are presenting the major fashion exhi - bition  The Belgians , about the rise and success of Belgian fashion  designers. The exhibition takes a closer look at the DNA of Bel - gian fashion and sheds light on the work of around 100 designers,  from the first pioneers to the new generation of today."






staircase detail of 
Xavier Hufkens Gallery in Brussels





a front door detail in Antwerp





the ceiling of the Galerie Ravenstein in Brussels




 The entrance to the Graanmarkt 13 
Restaurant in Antwerp




 the lights of Jos Van Devriendt






"ModeMuseum at ModeNatie in the Nationalestraat, in the heart of the Antwerp’s fashion district. The building that houses ModeNatie was built in the 19th century as a department store for the New England Menswear and Children’s fashion shop. After a thorough renovation in 2000, led by Marie-José Van Hee, the architect from Ghent..."






Entrance to Villa Empain, Brussels





A wall piece that was currently on display at the Villa Empain, Brussels.
BogHossian Foundation, "Heaven and Hell. From magic carpets to drones..."






Ceramic lighting pendant
a visit to Emery et Cie showroom in Brussels.





downstairs at the Stephan Schneider store in Antwerp.
 



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OPENHOUSE 

House is not universal. 
House is hyper-specific. (midtown 120 intro)




"the life we share"

A new magazine launched this year called Open House Magazine. Based in Barcelona, Spain, OPENHOUSE explores the space that results from the intersection of design and food, "the life of the interior, if you will." What happens to spaces after they are designed, how they function, and the people that inhabit the spaces and the stories they tell. The Autumn/Winter Issue has articles with Jerome Waag, Head Chef at Chez Panisse in San Francisco, and the FvF Apartment in Berlin, among others. Looking forward to more issues. Congrats Andrew and Mari! - David John







"OPENHOUSE Magazine is a twice yearly publication, that looks to bright, creative people from around the world, that open their homes or their private spaces to the public, to make different activities about gastronomy, art and design.  Printed in Lleida, Openhouse is a magazine of 144 pages, filled with beautiful photography, interesting interviews of people who open special places around the world that the reader can visit and join in with the activities.   Openhouse is also a guide to their secret loved places in their towns, and some favourite recipes. Openhouse is a multi lingual publication; all articles are published in English and the language of the interviewee.   

Openhouse was started by Andrew Trotter and Mari Luz Vidal, and we are building a small team of collaborators who are designers, writers and photographers from all around the world." 













more about Openhouse Magazine here.



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Nordic Modernism

"Whereas Bauhaus architects and designers spurned historical developments and advocated materials such as tubular steel and rigid forms to meet the needs of mass production, their Scandinavian counterparts in Sweden, Denmark, and Finland adopted a distinct humanist view by combining international modernist principles with regional craft traditions."



"Nordic Modernism"

An exhibition that explores early functionalist traditions of Scandinavia. Jacksons presents 'Nordic Modernism', an exhibition that explores the early Functionalist traditions of Scandinavia. Whereas Bauhaus architects and designers spurned historical developments and advocated materials such as tubular steel and rigid forms to meet the needs of mass production, their Scandinavian counterparts in Sweden, Denmark, and Finland adopted a distinct humanist view by combining international modernist principles with regional craft traditions. 

Swedish pioneer Axel Einar Hjorth passionately promoted the adoption of functionalism in Scandinavia. Parallel to the launch of Nordic Modernism at the Stockholm Exhibition 1930, Hjorth was commissioned to design the interior of the Tösse bakery, several original chairs from which are on display at Jacksons. The pre-war furniture, textiles, and lighting in the exhibition illustrate key features of a uniquely Scandinavian approach to Modernism. 










 


Jacksons Berlin 
Lindenstraße 34, 10969 Berlin
Tuesday – Saturday, 12 – 6 pm

Jacksons specializes in the best of Scandinavian and international vintage design 1900 - 2000 with main focus on Scandinavian classics.  Opening their first gallery in 1981, Paul and Carina Jackson have built one of the most extensive collections of twentieth-century Scandinavian and international vintage design. Celebrating over three decades in Stockholm, Jacksons has earned a reputation for providing an unparalleled standard of quality and expertise in the field. Jacksons maintains a deep respect for natural patina and original wear, which has contributed to the unique character of these historic pieces.   

In 2007, Jacksons launched a satellite location in Berlin situated in the "Galerienhaus", alongside some of Europe's leading contemporary art galleries. Jacksons Berlin provides a platform to experiment with new forms of exhibiting and re-invigorating historical design. The gallery seeks to mediate design history with thematic exhibitions, and to promote the work of some of the finest twentieth-century designers, architects, and artists working in furniture, lighting, ceramics, glass, and textiles.





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new DISC Interiors
project coming soon, "Rustic Canyon"




For the past 2 years, we've been working with Bilden Corp. and our clients on designing a dream home that is nestled into Rustic Canyon, California. A home constructed of cement, white oak, glass, steel, cedar, brass, and raw materials that speak to nature and a purity of vision.  We've been installing the project for the past couple weeks as the last minute details get completed. - David John




white bronze with white oak kitchen cabinetry, designed by DISC Interiors



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new works
by Jason Miller





"Jungle" : May 7 - May 30  

An exhibition of new lights and mirrors Opening May 7th (6:00 - 8:00) at Heller Gallery 303 10th Avenue New York, NY 10001 

The show features three new mirror projects and a special installation of Fiddlehead. Here is what Jason writes about the show. "Three thousand feet above sea level, the Central American jungle is a series of frighteningly steep mountains covered by mist and seemingly held together by a tangled mass of vegetation. The density and sameness render it almost monochromatic until one stumbles on to an impossibly hued flower hanging from nowhere as if floating." 

The nineteenth century painter, Martin Johnson Heade, captured this beautifully in his paintings from Brazil and Nicaragua. “Jungle” is an attempt to do the same in mirror and light.







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"I Hardly Ever 
Thought of Flowers..." 

new works by Johannes Nagel 




There is a sense of provisionality about the works of ceramicist Johannes Nagel – we know they are finished because they are glazed, fired, and presented, but they allow for continued questioning of the concept of the vessel – what it signifies, what memories of other objects it evokes, the deep conventions of the ceramic discipline. Nagel has the agility to work in accretive and reductive ways: his vessels may be thrown, built, collaged, or cast in moulds excavated in sand. Nagel embraces the lo-tech of the sand-cast, using no tools and limiting his forms to those possible through the use of his hands, together and separately. The basis of thrown ceramics is the rotational form, around a central axis. Once throwing is abandoned for other techniques, there is no need to adhere to the rotational, but the artist acknowledges the convention of the vessel by using rotation even in his cast works. He hand-gouges spaces in a loose material, imperfectly describing an orbit, before lining the void with liquid porcelain. He describes this improvised technique - direct, informed, intuitive - and the relationship between the imagined form and the result, as “sculptural unsharpness”. 

Johannes Nagel's work is part of the permanent collection of the Victoria & Albert museum.


more information here at Gallery Fumi.




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new ceramic works by 
Wouter Hoste

"I wish I never saw the sunshine 
I wish I never saw the sunshine " (beth orton)



 Perignem Studio in Beernem


In a few weeks, I'll be traveling to Antwerp, Brussels, and Ghent in search of architecture, design and decorative art, and hopefully be doing a few studio visits while I am there with some Belgian designers. If there are any studios I should visit, please reach out to me.  I recently became fascinated with a ceramicist working in Antwerp who is creating towering lamps that appear to be inspired by this notion and struggle of "lightness vs darkness" as well as other vessels.

Wouter Hoste's new ceramic works are simply otherworldly, inspired by science fiction and scenes from Kubrick's "2001 Space Odyssey" as well as the minimal black and white atmosphere seen in THX by George Lucas.  Hoste's works are handmade, built and constructed by coils and slab building, which lead to irregular forms that give his work a unique sense of strength and imbalance.  His palette consists of an incredible deep "blackness" and "foamy" whites, as well of off whites and metallic silvers.

Born in Ghent Belgium, Hoste graduated from the Antwerp Art Academy in the fashion department, and is currently working in Antwerp at the Perignem Studio in Beernem.  His works can be currently seen at Galeria Patrick Fourtin in Paris, with selections from his "Moonraker" series and the "Essential Surface" series. - David John


























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"Ain't I a giver, don't I deliver in black for morning tea?
Long hair raker, deep dark acre, you've gone and lost just me.
We've got to keep on, got to keep on, keeping on" (tiny ruins)





Perhaps it is the weather turning oh so quickly.
As the breathe becomes short and the days stretch with the giver.
The color of green stains everything. A tattoo.
Pebbles catching the cat's eyes. - David John









1. Image unknown
2. Pope Valley Pottery, photo by Mimi Giboin
3. Vintage Lamp, source forgotten.


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The Gilded Owl

"While collaborating on the renovation and redesign of a 1785 federal style house in Hudson, New York Andy and Elizabeth conceived a new vision for a unique retail space."



One of my favorite design blogs, The Gilded Owl,  
opens a retail space in Hudson, New York. Congrats Andy!


"While collaborating on the renovation and redesign of a 1785 federal style house in Hudson, New York Andy and Elizabeth conceived a new vision for a unique retail space. after years of neglect and stripping the house back to its stunning origins the rooms unfolded as a sequence of spaces that would allow the two and a half year old blog to become a real living gallery. The designers and artists that have inspired The Gilded Owl founders to write about and photograph the details of their exemplary work will be harmoniously exhibited together. Thus allowing visitors to be inspired by design and the way creative forces influence the way we live."










Visit The Gilded Owl here..


If you want to know a secret 
What are you waiting for? 
If you want to ask me something
I can tell you so much more 
If you want to cause me trouble 
It's not up to me 
I know that there's something missing










lyrics by Caribou "back home"
photographs, sources unknown.




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a conversation with Michael Felix 

"My family mostly wants me to be successful in an American Dream kind of way. They’re Old School. My grandfather grew up in an Italian family in Cincinnati and had an arranged marriage with my Italian grandmother. And my mom grew up in South America. So I think they still carry that immigrant mentality."



 "The standard sofa"


"you don't fall far from the tree now."  - bob moses

Last December on an extremely dark and rainy afternoon in Los Angeles, Nathalie, a good friend took me to the studio of furniture designer Michael Felix.  Luckily, Michael's studio happens to be only a block away from where I live in downtown LA.  The Arts District is a neighborhood that is quickly transforming with art galleries (Hauser and Wirth, Ibid, Museum as Retail Space) and small boutique stores, restaurants, and young designers. Michael recently moved into his studio space, which is subdivided with many other artists and designers in a beautiful decaying 1920's paint factory building. We talked for a few hours about the intention of Michael's works, the first year start-up of his line, and his family history, of being a 3rd generation upholstery designer. There are an incredible amount of furniture designers working and emerging in Los Angeles at the moment, but very few I know of that are 3rd generation. Michael's work is both a nod to the past in technique, material, and familiar forms, and a request for entry into the future. Eager to see where he takes this collection.  Thanks Michael for the conversation.   - David John

"Michael Felix is a handcrafted furniture company that designs and produces upholstered goods in Southern California. A 3rd generation upholstery designer, Michael started from the ground up as a sample-maker’s assistant in the furniture factory founded in 1959 by his grandfather. His in-depth understanding of classic upholstery techniques makes for a collection that is thoughtfully designed, structurally engineered and made for a lifetime of use.  Each piece of furniture is made to order by hand in California, allowing for a maximum amount of customization of fabrics and finishes. Michael also designs custom furniture solutions for commercial and residential projects."  




"the friends stool"







Michael Felix











 A converation with Michael Felix:

Describe your working background and how you came to launch your own furniture line? 

After high school I was taking art classes and looking for a part time job. I was interested in design but didn’t have a specific focus so I decided to work at my dads upholstery company, learning from the ground up and apprenticing with the sample makers. It was a great way to immerse myself in the process and I also became really good friends with the craftsmen. After a couple years I became more involved and started designing for some of his clients. And eventually came to the point where I thought it would be fun to do my own thing.

When did you launch your own furniture line?

I launched my line about a year ago.

What is your specialty? 

My specialty is upholstered goods because I have access to incredible craftsmen and production. I’m currently working on some wood items at the moment like shelving and side tables.

Is there a lot of pressure on you from your family since you're a third generation furniture designer and decided to branch out on your own?

My family mostly wants me to be successful in an American Dream kind of way. They’re Old School. My grandfather grew up in an Italian family in Cincinnati and had an arranged marriage with my Italian grandmother. And my mom grew up in South America. So I think they still carry that immigrant mentality.

What are some of the challenges you faced when you first started your own line? 

A lot of challenges were small business style obstacles and the stress of doing something new. Believing in it but also not really knowing what it will be or how things will work.

Where is your furniture made? Everything is made in LA and the surrounding areas.

Since you come from a lineage of furniture designers, what is something one should consider when picking out a great sofa?

I’d say being comfortable would be the most important thing and of course the quality of the construction from sewing to the frame. The quality of the cover is important too. It’s what you’ll see all the time.

How much influence does your family have in what you design? 

I ask them what they think of things because they have a lot of experience. But in the end I trust my gut and everything is my decision


visit Michael Felix's site here. 
photography by Brandon Wickenkamp


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